Art Basel Miami Beach

2013
Art Nova, Hall B, Booth N29, Francesca Minini
Francesco Simeti and Matthias Bitzer

December 5 - 8, 2013

Opening hours:
Thursday 5 th - Saturday 7th: noon - 8 pm
Sunday 8th: noon - 6 pm

www.artbaselmiamibeach.com

Francesco Simeti is known for his site-specific installations that are achieved through a multi-disciplinary approach using wallpaper, video, digital prints, three-dimensional elements, and – beginning with this project – ceramic sculptures. In his work the artist presents aesthetically charming scenes that, under a more attentive gaze, reveal darker tones.The wallpaper Towers and Ferriswheels plays with an idea of the city as a domestic landscape, familiar yet exotic and unsettling.

  • Stacks Image 305

  • Stacks Image 306

    Link
  • Stacks Image 307

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 319

    Caption Text

    Link
  • Stacks Image 395

    Caption Text

    Link

Marked by clouds and trails of smoke this landscape refers to the tradition of landscape painting, both Western and Eastern. The imagery that composes this ambiguous scenery has its origins in newspapers, magazines and books about botany from the artist’s collection.Ferris wheels, refinery towers and piping coalesce and are transformed into trees and other natural elements in a continuous play of metamorphosis that is carried over into the installation in the center of the stand. The tables that Simeti has designed to display the ceramics take up, in their shape and style, the geometries that are one of the trademarks of Matthias Bitzer’s work. The ceramic sculptures represent philodendron leaves, a plant that is found frequently in the Miami area. With its fast rate of growth, this type of vegetation often tends to surround and engulf buildings and man-made structures, almost as though it were attempting to re-appropriate spaces that once belonged to nature. Here Bitzer as well re-appropriates space by means of painting on wallpaper. By applying layer of white paint on Simeti’s pattern he conceals some parts and thus limits its legibility. Two covered neon lights, whose light filters through the spaces left open by the artist to form words. An installation that accompanies us through smoke rings, a face, a photograph, words, some letters that seem to be searching for an order and that fracture the linearity of though. Finally a canvas held in a cabinet, precious but inaccessible. The most evident characteristics of Matthias Bitzer’s works are the resolution of the pictorial into ornamental geometry, the overlapping of divergent images, and the use of a vocabulary of abstract forms that through a changing perspective always put figurative details into relief. In this way the perception of familiar places changes continuously, inside and outside alternate by repeatedly inverting one another and intertwining with the continuous metamorphosis between industrial and natural landscapes that run along the walls of the stand.